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20110301
20110331
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CSPAN2 12
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CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:00pm EDT
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 9:00pm EST
. >> host: ruben carter, thank you for joining us this wonderful day. how old are you now? >> guest: i will be 74-years-old in may, and that's dr. rubin carter. i have to honor the doctorate degrees. one from australia, went to law school in 2003 and the western university in 2005. so it's dr.. spearman both in australia? in canada? but me read, in your book is called i of the hurricane, might have from darkness to freedom with a speed by nelson mandela and york cocoa authoress tamp class ki. you see my main purpose of writing the book is to share with you that i have discovered the truth but the love of truth is the spirit of man given where i was and how long i was there this is incredible. i have no business at all been here now. >> guest: that is absolutely correct. >> host: you say you were in jail 40 something years. what do you mean by that? >> guest: i was in jail -- the fact that we are born into a prison actually, when we are born we are complete with all of possibilities in tact but we are also born into a world of sleeping people where he ate and war and death and destructi
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 11:00pm EST
the living room with a shotgun. >> guest: yes, my family life wasn't by use, is was outside the family life that you have to realize that in may i will be 74-years-old and so my mother and father come from a generation where they thought if they child put his hands on his parents or even threatened the parent since they brought you into this world they will take you out this world as well. that was the type of society. >> host: described to the people who are watching who might want to read the book why you would be facing your father with a shotgun and he with a shotgun facing you. >> guest: because i was a very angry young man at the time, and i confronted my brother who was a highly successful active academic. he was the damnedest to graduate harvard university with a phd. he later became the superintendent of schools of boston, and i was in and out of reformatory schools all of my youth. so my father had to sort of choose between which one he was going to support, and i confronted my brother because when i came home from the military in 1956i heard my brother was hanging out with homose
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 12:00am EDT
: thank you very much. >> host: the west is being overtaken by the east. give us the nos shell explanation. >> guest: it's interesting. this bizarre time in society was almost obsessed with what's going on in the east and china and the other places. of course, it's fascinating, but my book is really about the errors made here in the united states and europe. it's a home-grown program on policy nothing to do with china, things like education, all the structural problems like infrastructure and energy problems that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 10:00pm EDT
and they use their mind. and you are talking about a war machines to fight the wars and people don't and they don't use their mind. >> on that note i think we want to speak greek heroes both for the troops and for the taxpayers. you spend your lives on this work and i won the end and let the audience to. [applause] >> you can download a pds of version of the pentagon labyrinth for free for the center of defense information website. go to cdi.org. >>> coming up next, booktv presents "after words," an hour-long program will be invited guest hosts to interview authors. acclaim economist dambisa moyo discusses her latest book, "how the west was lost 50 years of economic folly and the storch leases that lie ahead." the best-selling author argues that the flood of economic decisions made by western government have resulted in the skills of economic growth being tipped in favor of what she calls "the emerging world. she talks with libertarian economist dan mitchell. the >> host: my name is to dan mitchell at the cato institute and we are here to talk with dambisa moyo, adis on author abou
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 10:00pm EST
.. >> host: rubin carter, thank you for joining us this wonderful day. how old are you now? >> guest: i will be 74 years old in may, and that's dr. rubin carter. >> host: because of honorary degrees? >> guest: i have two honorary doctors' degrees. one from brisbane, australia, law school in 2003 and one from york university in 2005. so it's dr. rubin -- >> host: both in australia? >> guest: no -- >> host: oh, york is in canada. >> guest: that's correct. >> host: your book is called "eye of the hurricane: my path from darkness to freedom," with a forward by nelson mandela. >> guest: yes. >> host: and your co-author is ken clot key. >> guest: that's correct. >> host: you say your main purpose is to share with you i have discovered the truth. >> guest: to be the truth. >> host: well, it says the love of truth is the spirit of man. given for where i was and for how long i was there -- this is incredible -- i have no business at all being here now. >> guest: that is absolutely correct. >> host: now, you say you were in jail 40-something years. what do you mean by that? >> guest:
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 12:00pm EDT
-- children growing up. now, when we were children all of these folks used to dress up on halloween like women and they looked better than the women on the streets, you know? but now he was home on vacation from harvard university, and they were doing the same thing. so i confronted my brother about that and we started to fight. and, of course, i beat him up. and that's when my father got -- that's when my father got involved in this, and my father jumped me because much. -- because of that. and i pushed my father away and told him not to put his hands on them. that i would allow anyone put their hands anger on me anymore and my father ran and got his shotgun and i ran and got my shotgun. this is the same thing that happened to marvin gaye and his father and that's why marvin's father shot him and killed him. and had it not been for my mother, my father would have killed me as well. >> because your mother intervened and say you should get out of here. get away. >> now, what's interesting here is you just described yourself technically having been in jail for 20 years, '66 to '85. >> guest: huc
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 12:00pm EDT
. you mentioned the little try. tell us about that too, the major tribes in kenya and how did this affect the obama family became not only was raised by became aware politically? >> guest: the luo originated in southern sudan. i'm going back now to about the 1200s, and as they tried, they migrated south down the white nile into uganda and then east into western kenya. they arrived in western kenya i suppose our roundabout 1500, much the same sort time that columbus sailed to the new world. and establish themselves around the east shore of lake victoria. and they developed their clear identity as an individual separate tribe. but, of course, they also displaced other tribes. there were other tribes that were living in that part of africa before the lilo or ride. when the tribal groups started to reform themselves, you ended up with actually they were over 40 different tribes in kenya but the dominant tribes are the gto which comprise about 25% of the nation, and the dholuo for about 12 or 15%. so the little are the third largest try but they punch above their weight because the
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
interesting and very tribal history. you mentioned the tribe. tell us about the major tribes in kenya and how did this affect the milieu in which the obama family became -- not only was raised but became aware politically? >> well, it originated in suzanne and i'm going back now to right about the 1200s so a long time ago. as a tribe, they migrated south down the island down to a land east into western kenya and they arrived in western kenya, i suppose, around about the 1500s, much of the time that columbus sailed to the new world. and they established themselves around the eastern shore of lake victoria. and they developed their clear identity as an individual separate tribe but, of course, they also displaced other tribes there because there were other tribes that were living in that part of africa before they arrived. when the tribal groups started to really form themselves, you ended up with actually over -- there were over 40 different tribes in kenya but the dominant tribes which comprised about 25% of the nation and then others who are about 12 or 13%. they are the third largest tribe
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 6:00pm EDT
an airline company, someone who needs to use a lot of fuel a regular basis. and of course feel prices go up and make another severe adverse impact on profitability. so an airline company, realizing crude oil is at $80 a barrel and they are concerned to make it a $100 a barrel, they have the ability to purchase all they need at a price those $80 knowing that will be better final cost of the product. >> at too much risk and want to shove it off onto some other people? .. based on his published and unpublished papers unsealed in 2006. albert einstein published his general theory of relativity on march 20th 1916. >> after the inaugural book last night in new york city i'm proud to say the women's national democratic club is walter isaacson's first of 40 stocks on his 30 city book tour for einstein, his life and universal and purchased it is for sale after the luncheon and walter will be staying around after the q&a to find copies. when he became editor of "time" magazine was going to have to pick a person of the century. the more i thought about the more fascinated i became a feins
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 9:00pm EDT
. you mentioned the lull tried. tell us about the major tribes in kenya and how did this affect which the obama family became not only raised but became aware politically. >> guest: well, they originated in southern sudan and i am going back now to the 1200's or a long time ago, and as it tried they migrated south down the island to northern ugonda and then east into western kenya and they arrived in western kenya as opposed to about the 1500's the time columbus sailed to the new world and the established themselves around the eastern shore of lake and they developed their clear identity as an individual separate tribe but also displeased other tribes because there were other tribes living in that part of africa before the euro arrived. when the tribal groups started to form themselves you ended up with over 40 different tribes in kenya but the dominant tribes barbecue which comprise ab who was and so there's always been this tension. now the most recent example of that was the terrible violence that there was in kenya in 2007, early 2008 where people died and there were still hundred
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2011 12:00am EDT
wrote and which problems facing us are socialism and he called himself an african specialist. to describe that essay in the context of debates within kenya and it was. when we think of anticolonialism we think there are different species of anticolonialism. it was more pro-western, more pre-market, it was tom, obama's tauter's mentor. he was more on the left and then on the far left and he was basically pro-soviet and so you have these species of anticolonialism. talk a little bit about that landscape. it's fascinating people often think about anticolonialism as one thing, but it actually has many different colors. >> guest: it was an exciting time in kenya because they had at long last gotten their independence in 1963 and all the students in the american universities for all pulling back into my robie to get jobs in government most of which had been vacated by the british who were going home. and was a very exciting time in which the government would try to find out really what sort of political system was going to invest in their country. you were searching intercolonial a
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12